Read the Book of Mormon and the Bible

Joseph Smith is being vindicated in the eyes of those who read, study, and seek to understand the purpose of the Book of Mormon. Scholars and historians are taking notice and are not dismissing the record as a farce. Recently, BYU-TV started running a program titled New Day for the Book of Mormon. I encourage you to consider the program. You may be surprised who is speaking out in defense and favor of the ancient record.

The Book of Mormon is still being printed today in over 115 languages. Well over a 150 million copies have been printed since the first copies were released in March of 1830. It is not going to go away. Missionaries will continue to flood the earth with the book and the invitation to read it.

Study its message without antagonistic motives. Don’t look beyond the mark.

The Book of Mormon’s central message is salvation through Jesus Christ. One overarching theme in the book is Christ as a deliverer, individually and collectively. When a righteous people turn to Him “with full purpose of heart and… serve him with all diligence of mind” (Mosiah 7:33) they are delivered out of bondage (which bondage comes in spiritual and physical ways; both depicted in the Book of Mormon).

One of the principal prophets of the ancient record told us the intent was to show scattered Israel the covenants of the Lord and convince all that Jesus is the Christ, the eternal God. He also exhorted us to “come unto Christ, and lay hold upon every good gift, and touch not the evil gift, nor the unclean thing” (Moroni 10:30). A timely invitation, as many today are quick to lay hold and support evil and unclean behaviors and practices. This principal prophet also extended these words in closing the record:

       “Yea, come unto Christ, and be perfected in him, and deny yourselves of all ungodliness;               and if ye shall deny yourselves of all ungodliness, and love God with all your might, mind             and strength, then is his grace sufficient for you, that by his grace ye may be perfect in                 Christ; and if by the grace of God ye are perfect in Christ, ye can in nowise deny the power           of God” (Read Moroni 10).

The teachings and accounts of people in the Book of Mormon and the Bible invite us to deny ourselves of ungodliness. I can’t think of a better invitation in a world that seeks ignorantly and deliberately, after ungodliness.

The problem is Americans are not reading scripture or showing interest in religious words. We are in many instances indifferent to the word of God or God speaking anew in our day. Even many who attend weekly religious services read little of the Bible. When they do read, it is more surface than depth; it is more selective than comprehensive. We have in the religious community a habit of opening the scriptures to slowly and closely them to quickly. Maybe our lack of interest in reading the scriptures is a direct reflection of our lack of self-control, our lack for the love of virtue.

The teachings, accounts, prophecies, and cherished visitation of the Savior in appearing to a people in America after His resurrection, can help us come unto Jesus Christ and love His commandments over the vain and false philosophies and practices evident in current trends and events. (Read 3 Nephi 11-30)

The Book of Mormon, like the Bible, is full of revelation and will nurture revelation in anyone who sincerely reads and ponders the message in their hearts. Sincere readers will draw closer to the Savior as they read the Book of Mormon.

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3 thoughts on “Read the Book of Mormon and the Bible

  1. Jon Layton

    Really enjoyed this! No doubt, the Book of Mormon’s central message is about Christ! It gives me great direction and understanding as I study it along with the Bible. I love the phrase “looking beyond the mark!” That’s how blindness and sin come into our lives. (Jacob 4)

    Reply
  2. downtown dave

    “Yea, come unto Christ, and be perfected in him, and deny yourselves of all ungodliness; and if ye shall deny yourselves of all ungodliness, and love God with all your might, mind and strength, then is his grace sufficient for you, that by his grace ye may be perfect in Christ; and if by the grace of God ye are perfect in Christ, ye can in nowise deny the power of God” (Read Moroni 10). From the Book of Mormon.

    2 Nephi 25:23, “For we labor diligently to write, to persuade our children, and also our brethren, to believe in Christ, and to be reconciled to God; for we know that it is by grace that we are saved, after all we can do.” From the Book of Mormon.

    This is actually a works based gospel, which the Bible and the Gospel of the Bible opposes. Grace means unmerited or unearned favor. The two passages above say that God’s grace kicks in after all we can do. That’s unscriptural.

    Paul the Apostle says in Romans 11:6, “And if by grace, then it cannot be based on works; if it were, grace would no longer be grace.”

    He also says in Romans 4:5, “However, to the one who does not work but trusts God who justifies the ungodly, their faith is credited as righteousness.”

    And Ephesians 2:8-9 says, “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith, and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God, not by works, so that no one can boast.”

    So the Bible and the Gospel of the Bible is in opposition to the gospel of Mormonism. And to go just a step further, the Smithsonian says that there is no archaeological evidence to support the claims of the Book of Mormon.

    So, yes. Study the Scriptures (the Bible). And discover what is true.

    Reply
    1. Ryan C. Jenkins Post author

      Downtownminisitries

      Your reply is an example of selective reading of the scriptures. Why not quote James 2:18, 22? James was a disciple of the Savior and new what the Savior taught. What about considering the Savior’s words on the matter: Matthew 5:16, 16:27.

      The scriptures are in harmony with idea of grace and works and is nicely reflected in 2 Nephi 25:23. Consider the following definition and explanation as held by those in the LDS faith. Paul was granted grace, “the enabling power, the “divine strength” to accomplish his ministry which required him to do the works of God. I am sure both you and I have had those moments where the Lord extended to us His grace, (enabling power, and divine strength) in our own personal ministries.

      Grace is a “word that occurs frequently in the New Testament, especially in the writings of Paul. The main idea of the word is divine means of help or strength, given through the bounteous mercy and love of Jesus Christ.
      It is through the grace of the Lord Jesus, made possible by His atoning sacrifice, that mankind will be raised in immortality, every person receiving his body from the grave in a condition of everlasting life. It is likewise through the grace of the Lord that individuals, through faith in the Atonement of Jesus Christ and repentance of their sins, receive strength and assistance to do good works that they otherwise would not be able to maintain if left to their own means. This grace is an enabling power that allows men and women to lay hold on eternal life and exaltation after they have expended their own best efforts. Divine grace is needed by every soul in consequence of the Fall of Adam and also because of man’s weaknesses and shortcomings. However, grace cannot suffice without total effort on the part of the recipient. Hence the explanation, “It is by grace that we are saved, after all we can do” (2 Ne. 25:23). It is truly the grace of Jesus Christ that makes salvation possible. This principle is expressed in Jesus’ parable of the vine and the branches (John 15:1–11). See also John 1:12–17; Eph. 2:8–9; Philip. 4:13; D&C 93:11–14.”

      Thanks for chiming in,
      All the best

      Reply

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